Linux Install – Why my Disk Space is Lower than expected?

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When installing QuickBox, you might of noticed that your disk space that is available for your media, applications and more is lower than expected.

This is because with any Linux installation, it reserves roughly 5% of your disk space to prevent your disk space getting to 100% (known as Filesystem Reserved Space). This is both a security measure and a Disk Drive Health measure. The filesystem reserved blocks also serve to provide the system with free blocks with which to defragment the filesystem. Clearly, this isn’t something you’d want to do on a filesystem utilizing QuickBox Pro, as it contains a database, or in most circumstances with a seeebox doing a large number of writes and deletions.

Unfortunately, due to this restriction, QuickBox is unable to override this functionality and is unable to give you that disk space back.

Since QuickBox will not automatically reduce this percentage, we are not above the means to provide you a solution to adjusting this.

We would advise reducing to no less than 2%, just to ensure you have some room for the necessary defragmentation of the filesystem as well as space to ensure 100% disk fill up is avoided.

Check your disk with running df -h:

# df -h
Filesystem                  Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev                        devtmpfs  3.8G     0  3.8G   0% /dev
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M   79M  702M  11% /run
/dev/mapper/reaper--vg-root ext4       30G  8.5G   20G  30% /
tmpfs                       tmpfs     3.9G   22M  3.8G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs                       tmpfs     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
tmpfs                       tmpfs     3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/sda1                   ext2      720M  157M  527M  23% /boot
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M  8.0K  780M   1% /run/user/1000
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M     0  780M   0% /run/user/0

In a Linux environment, tune2fs is an indispensable tool, used to tune parameters on ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems. From the output above we can see that we can modify the ext4 types, respectively /dev/mapper/reaper--vg-root and /dev/sda1.

tune2fs -m 1 /dev/mapper/reaper--vg-root
tune2fs 1.42.13 (17-May-2015)
Setting reserved blocks percentage to 1% (79493 blocks)

From the above output, we used -m 1 to reduce our reserved blocks percentage to 1%. Let’s take a look at df -h now.

# df -h
Filesystem                  Type      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev                        devtmpfs  3.8G     0  3.8G   0% /dev
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M   79M  702M  11% /run
/dev/mapper/reaper--vg-root ext4       30G  8.5G   21G  29% /
tmpfs                       tmpfs     3.9G   22M  3.8G   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs                       tmpfs     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
tmpfs                       tmpfs     3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/sda1                   ext2      720M  157M  556M  22% /boot
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M  8.0K  780M   1% /run/user/1000
tmpfs                       tmpfs     780M     0  780M   0% /run/user/0

As you can see, we have reduced our used space from 30% to 29%. Of course, this is simply a small Proxmox test VM, but this shows how simple it can be to remove/reduce the limits that Linux places by a default. This is especially handy for servers utilizing TB worth of space.

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